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Historias y personas en todos los formatos

bbcnewsus:

Around the World with the BBC: Mexican mine’s toxic spillage closes schools in Sonora
The authorities said 88 schools were not able to open this week for fear pupils could come into contact with water contaminated with acids.
The spillage from the mine turned a tributary to the Sonora river orange.
Environmental authorities have filed a criminal complaint against the copper mine blamed for the accident.

bbcnewsus:

Around the World with the BBC: Mexican mine’s toxic spillage closes schools in Sonora

The authorities said 88 schools were not able to open this week for fear pupils could come into contact with water contaminated with acids.

The spillage from the mine turned a tributary to the Sonora river orange.

Environmental authorities have filed a criminal complaint against the copper mine blamed for the accident.

MOD crece su propuesta localEl festival de artes digitales creado por el CAAV tendrá dos sedes, con lo que espera duplicar la asistencia de la mano de mayor talento local, de Europa y América.

MOD crece su propuesta local
El festival de artes digitales creado por el CAAV tendrá dos sedes, con lo que espera duplicar la asistencia de la mano de mayor talento local, de Europa y América.

(vía Evocación multidisciplinaria arreolina tuvo nutrida asistencia - Grupo Milenio)

wired:

These gorgeous aerial shots of Miami’s and New York’s beaches were taken while hanging from a helicopter.

The colors and patterns of the umbrellas reveal which beaches are public and which are private. 

MORE

(Source: Wired)

Sexta edición del festival de artes digitales MOD espera a 12 mil asistentes
(por Festival de Arte Digital MOD)
wired:

Presenting our September cover: Edward Snowden, photographed by Platon. Read our exclusive profile of Snowden here.

wired:

Presenting our September cover: Edward Snowden, photographed by Platon. Read our exclusive profile of Snowden here.

guardian:

Supermoon.

Credits on photos. 

(Source: theguardian.com)

Expertos en ébola instan a la OMS a aceptar fármacos experimentales en África - ABC.es

Piot, Farrar y Heymann cuestionaron por qué no tenían los africanos la misma oportunidad. Si el virus mortal se extiende por países ricos, dijeron, los organismos médicos «comenzarían a hablar con las compañías y laboratorios que desarrollan estos productos y luego tomarán decisiones rápidas sobre cuáles de ellos podrían ser apropiados para uso compasivo».

skunkbear:

So photographer David Slater wants Wikipedia to remove a monkey selfie that was taken with his camera. As you can see from this screen shot, Wikipedia says no: the monkey pressed the shutter so it owns the copyright.

We got NPR’s in-house legal counsel, Ashley Messenger, to weigh in. She said:

Traditional interpretation of copyright law is that the person who captured the image owns the copyright. That would be the monkey. The photographer’s best argument is that the monkey took the photo at his direction and therefore it’s work for hire. But that’s not a great argument because it’s not clear the monkey had the intent to work at the direction of the photographer nor is it clear there was “consideration” (value) exchanged for the work. So… It’s definitely an interesting question! Or the photographer could argue that leaving the camera to see what would happen is his work an therefore the monkey’s capture of the image was really the photographer’s art, but that would be a novel approach, to my knowledge.

(via npr)

newsweek:

The Iraqi soldier died attempting to pull himself up over the dashboard of his truck. The flames engulfed his vehicle and incinerated his body, turning him to dusty ash and blackened bone.
In a photograph taken soon afterward, the soldier’s hand reaches out of the shattered windshield, which frames his face and chest. The colors and textures of his hand and shoulders look like those of the scorched and rusted metal around him.
Fire has destroyed most of his features, leaving behind a skeletal face, fixed in a final rictus. He stares without eyes.
On February 28, 1991, Kenneth Jarecke stood in front of the charred man, parked amid the carbonized bodies of his fellow soldiers, and photographed him. At one point, before he died this dramatic mid-retreat death, the soldier had had a name.
He’d fought in Saddam Hussein’s army and had a rank and an assignment and a unit. He might have been devoted to the dictator who sent him to occupy Kuwait and fight the Americans. Or he might have been an unlucky young man with no prospects, recruited off the streets of Baghdad. Jarecke took the picture just before a ceasefire officially ended Operation Desert Storm—the U.S.-led military action that drove Saddam Hussein and his troops out of Kuwait, which they had annexed and occupied the previous August.
The image and its anonymous subject might have come to symbolize the Gulf War. Instead, it went unpublished in the United States, not because of military obstruction but because of editorial choices.
It’s hard to calculate the consequences of a photograph’s absence. But sanitized images of warfare, The Atlantic’s Conor Friedersdorf argues, make it “easier … to accept bloodless language” such as 1991 references to “surgical strikes” or modern-day terminology like “kinetic warfare.”
The Vietnam War was notable for its catalog of chilling and iconic war photography; Some images, like Ron Haeberle’s pictures of the My Lai massacre, were initially kept from the public. But other violent images—Nick Ut’s scene of child napalm victims and Eddie Adams’s photo of a Vietcong man’s execution—won Pulitzer Prizes and had a tremendous impact on the outcome of the war.
The War Photo No One Would Publish - The Atlantic

newsweek:

The Iraqi soldier died attempting to pull himself up over the dashboard of his truck. The flames engulfed his vehicle and incinerated his body, turning him to dusty ash and blackened bone.

In a photograph taken soon afterward, the soldier’s hand reaches out of the shattered windshield, which frames his face and chest. The colors and textures of his hand and shoulders look like those of the scorched and rusted metal around him.

Fire has destroyed most of his features, leaving behind a skeletal face, fixed in a final rictus. He stares without eyes.

On February 28, 1991, Kenneth Jarecke stood in front of the charred man, parked amid the carbonized bodies of his fellow soldiers, and photographed him. At one point, before he died this dramatic mid-retreat death, the soldier had had a name.

He’d fought in Saddam Hussein’s army and had a rank and an assignment and a unit. He might have been devoted to the dictator who sent him to occupy Kuwait and fight the Americans. Or he might have been an unlucky young man with no prospects, recruited off the streets of Baghdad. Jarecke took the picture just before a ceasefire officially ended Operation Desert Storm—the U.S.-led military action that drove Saddam Hussein and his troops out of Kuwait, which they had annexed and occupied the previous August.

The image and its anonymous subject might have come to symbolize the Gulf War. Instead, it went unpublished in the United States, not because of military obstruction but because of editorial choices.

It’s hard to calculate the consequences of a photograph’s absence. But sanitized images of warfare, The Atlantic’s Conor Friedersdorf argues, make it “easier … to accept bloodless language” such as 1991 references to “surgical strikes” or modern-day terminology like “kinetic warfare.”

The Vietnam War was notable for its catalog of chilling and iconic war photography; Some images, like Ron Haeberle’s pictures of the My Lai massacre, were initially kept from the public. But other violent images—Nick Ut’s scene of child napalm victims and Eddie Adams’s photo of a Vietcong man’s execution—won Pulitzer Prizes and had a tremendous impact on the outcome of the war.

The War Photo No One Would Publish - The Atlantic